skip to Main Content
Get Lost And New York City

Get Lost and New York City

Photo Credits: Julian Cassady Photography

These two ideas said together can be true in so many ways when endeavoring into the nightlife scene of New York City. One particular concept that took 5,000+ party goers on a journey into  Queens was Damian Lazarus’s iconic event: Get Lost.

Currently on their 14th year, Damian and team decided to bring the party concept that never sleeps, to the city that never stops; New York City. The Knockdown Center (getting its name for being an old door manufacturing factory) is a 50,000 sqft, multi-room, industrial warehouse with nooks and crannies throughout, as well as an old glass blowing factory in the basement which has been turned into a techno club. This space just so happened to be the setting that took thousands of people through a ride of epic proportions. Within the space, there were 4-stages for the two day event.

Friday was an all-live experience where artists such as Mashrou’ Leila and Kelsey Lu brought their stimulating and eclectic sounds to transform the space into an endless journey of melodies and experimentations. It was the perfect way to set the bar for the rest of the weekend as the void opened, and crowds got lost in the ever-giving event that didn’t end until Sunday morning at 6am.

Saturday started at 2pm where artists such as Francesca Lombardo, Nic Fanciulli, and Robag Wruhme transformed the outdoor industrial area, surrounded by brick-built smoke-towers and rusted beams, into a sea of rhythm and energy where they opened the psychological void that carried the crowd into the state of mind of “getting lost”. The all-star line up set the vibe and moved the crowd until 10pm, where the event moved inside to a 3-room labyrinth. The main room, holding  thousands of people, was set with a massive build-out where the stage could be perceived as if you were entering into a portal. The stage was filled with heavy hitters such as The Martinez Brothers, Felix Da Housecat, and the man himself; Damian Lazarus. The music had a good range from melodic techno, house and tech-house, to some of the deeper ends of the spectrum within modern electronic music.

As you lost yourself journeying through space, you may have run into one of two other sound rooms, and a variety of art installations sprinkled through the labyrinth.

Next to the main room was a high energy, 400 person, intimate dance hall which was popping off with artists such as Joeski, Audiojack, and industry legend DJ Three. The space was engulfed with silver coils running through the canopy, and tasteful lighting, which allowed a warm and inviting dance floor that never stopped.

As you continued to venture through the warehouse, down hallways and outdoor redirects, you would then find yourself in what the Knockdown Center calls: The Basement. The dark, red-light-lit, brick basement with its rustic archways and small corridors, made you feel like you’re in an old power plant in Berlin…. The music was true to the space where crowd favorites Serge Devant and Carl Craig made it hard for anyone to leave, and truly “gest lost” in this dark void filled with techno.

What Get Lost honed in on outside of devising a massive line up, which could compete with any other event that occurs in New York , were some of the little things that frequent party goers take notice to.

Though the will call and door ticket line had a little bottle-neck at peak-hours, getting through check-in and security went quickly and smoothly. There were enough bartenders on staff where the bar line never became too long or a major issue. And most importantly (in my view), the bathroom lines were quick and efficient. For anyone who goes to these types of events often, we’re all well aware of how these factors can be “party killers”, and change a fun event, into one you can’t wait to leave…

For its first appearance in NYC, a scene where competition is more than plentiful, Get Lost had a positive impact satisfying those who went, and I could foresee this venture occuring again in the future.

Back To Top