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Steve Parry Shares 5 Production Tips To Make The Perfect Dancefloor Track

Steve Parry shares 5 production tips to make the perfect dancefloor track

Liverpool’s Steve Parry, one of the UK music scene’s most industrious, passionate and engaging characters, has just made an illustrious return to Bedrock with ‘Don’t You Ever Stop’.

With 25+ years of DJ experience behind the decks, monthly radio shows, running the always-impressive Selador Recordings (alongside Dave Seaman) and his ever-growing SMP3 Music operation, Steve Parry somehow still finds time to venture into Shoreditch’s Scrutton Street Studios and get creative at every opportunity. So he’s a perfect candidate to share some of his key production tips.

1. Get the most out of each sound you use

EQ your sound, effect your sound using its envelopes, adding plug in’s to give it another dimension, add delay and reverb – once you start really pushing the sound you use, it can take on another life of is own.

2. Don’t peak too soon

Make them wait for the moment – teasing is good, a good build helps the energy. Introduce a sound, but then (maybe) drop it and replace with another sound, only later delivering both together for impact. You wouldn’t go to see a film and want the best bit at the start of the film and the rest seem flat afterwards… keep ‘em keen, make them wait for the big bit!

3. Automation

I use lots of it – all the way through a track, on multiple channels – it makes a lot of difference. Just little tweaks throughout the track keep the tune constantly changing for your ears to stay interested.

4. Layers

Layers of sounds and background FX really add to the richness of a track for me – swooshes, lasers, anything that just adds something else to the atmosphere of the track.

5. Make a good outro

One for the DJ / Producers – make a good outro – I always make a tune with an ending that I can loop when DJing. Not just a kick and snare, no, I often drop the majority of the beats/percussion and kick, but I do keep a vocal loop at the end or bassline, something that’s a fairly recognizable part of your track, so that it can keep playing through the next track while you are playing it out in a club. It means you can keep your own track playing in the mix for as long as you need and can sound great in your set.

Steve Parry’s ‘Don’t You Ever Stop’ is now available on Bedrock. Get your copy here.

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